Weimaraners

The Weimaraner is a silver-gray breed of dog developed originally in early 19th century for hunting. Early Weimaraners were used by royalty for hunting large game, such as boar, bears, deer, and foxes. As the popularity of large game hunting began to decline, Weimaraners were used for hunting smaller animals, like fowl, rabbits, and foxes. Rather than having a specific purpose such as pointing or flushing, the Weimaraner is an all purpose gun dog. The Weimaraner is loyal and loving to his family, an incredible hunter, and a fearless guardian of his family and territory. The name comes from the Grand Duke of Weimar, Karl August, whose court enjoyed hunting.

The Weimaraner is a sleek, moderately large, athletic dog with beautiful lines. It comes in a short, fine, smooth gray coat or a rarer longhaired variety (FCI Group 7). All shades of gray are accepted. The head and ears are a bit lighter in color than the rest of the body. The head is long and aristocratic and the muzzle is strong. The eyes are amber, blue-gray or gray – with an intelligent expression, and the nose is gray. The ears are moderately long and pendant. The topline slopes gently downward from the withers. The forelegs should be straight and dewclaws may be removed in some cases. The tail is usually docked to 4cm when the dog is two days old. The limbs are long and muscular. The Weimaraner has webbed feet for swimming and has a reputation as a fine water retriever, though he may need to be taught to swim. Weimaraners have been used as rescue dogs, service dogs for the disabled, and as police dogs in England and Germany.

Happy, loving cheerful, affectionate and very rambunctious. Intelligent, but can be highly opinionated and willful, therefore this breed should have firm, experienced training from the start. Because this breed is so full of energy, the first thing they need to learn is sit, then praise only when sitting. This will prevent jumping in the future, as they are strong dogs and will knock over elderly or children by accident. Weimaraners are often kind to children, but are not recommended for very young ones because they are energetic enough to accidentally knock a child down.

This breed’s short and very smooth gray coat and its unusual eyes give it a regal appearance different from any other breed. The silvery-gray colour is rare in dogs and is the result of breeding for a recessive gene. It has also lent the breed the nickname ’silver ghost’ or ‘gray ghost.’ The coat is extremely low maintenance; it is short, hard, and smooth to the touch.

There is a long-haired variety that is recognized by most kennel clubs around the world except in North America. The long-haired Weimaraner has a silky coat, with – contrary to the short coated variety – an undocked, feathered tail. The gene is recessive, so breeding will produce some long-haired puppies only if both parents carry the recessive longhair gene.